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america, and they made the ultimate sacrifice for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and all the infrastructure that was here. beca
, yahoo maps. microsoft. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of crime in san francisco in t
us, but we will also support you. we are going to do the right thing. we are going to make sure we spend your money wisely, and this is what it will cost. all the experts agree this is what it will cost. not anymore. we do not necessarily know how to make it any less, but here is an actual number, and the results speak for themselves. 84% of the people supported the biggest general obligation bond in our city's history because they thought, i think, respected. they felt like city government was telling them the truth. there was no opposition to this bond because you could not oppose it unless you did not want to spend any more money. but you could not argue against the analysis. you could not argue against the due diligence, and i think that is an important lesson. i think this day represents an important statement of fact and commitment to the people of san francisco, that they will support things we could never have imagined supporting as long as we tell them the truth, as long as we are honest with people, as long as we are transparent, as long as we owned up, so i am extraordin
hard to get us here. i want to thank those just once again, the secretary, for his willingness to think differently and look differently at this project. this project was dead many many times, but it was because of his willingness to look at this in a new light and consider things that previous secretaries of the navy had not considered because of the great work of his staff and both the department of defense and because, more importantly, of the incredible commitment, not just passing interest, speaker ned to pelosi, who started this thing through three presidential administrations, secretaries of navy, mayors like me that come and go, members of the board of supervisors, treasure island development authority that stuck it out for all this time. to nancy pelosi, thank you yet again. what a remarkable effort. you deserve an enormous amount of credit. we thank you. we are proud of you. this is a big deal. on top of that, hunters point, which was a big deal. trans a terminal, doyle drive, the bay bridge. this is just getting things done. it is my honor now to ask up to the podium a fan of
recycling at home and use these bins you see behind me. i do not want this to become a psa for our recycling efforts, although that is always good, and remember, it is the kids teaching the adults, which is always good. but this is good for the environment, good for the economy, and a san francisco can do this, cities across california and cities across america can do this. i will remind you of the great line by michelangelo, who said that the biggest risk is not that we aim to hawaii and miss but that we aim to low and --. it would have been easy for us to have a goal of 50% recycling rate by 2020. a lot of states, a lot of cities across the state, that will be tow%8x4รง:vw1qs8mna ++%uq when you do that, you get people to organize that quality of imagination, where people in the private sector and public sector, using the entrepreneurial and innovative spirit coming up with new ideas and attitudes that may seem untoward or a little controversial or extreme at first, but suddenly, when you peel it back and look back two or three years, you go, "my gosh, that makes so much since." if you make
staffer, now my staffer, who worked so diligently through two administrations to get us through this day. i thank you. to the development team. to the residents of this island that have been patient beyond imagination. with the hope and expectation we would get to this point. to all those that are looking forward to the ground breaking to be hosted some time next year. it is pretty remarkable -- this is a small city, and about 10% of our land happens to be on three principal areas. all three of them former naval bases. out there in hunters point. the army out on presidio, and here on treasure island. 25-plus-hundred acres in the '70s -- the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. since then, we have been talking about revitalization. we have been talking about reconstituting these pieces of property. just two weeks ago i had the pleasure and privilege of signing 12 pieces of legislation, marking over the course of over two decades over the course of hunters point. creating a framework on an economic development framework for 10,500 new housing units, 32% of them below market. hundreds of thousa
us to overcome many of the challenges that we have faced, as you will hear throughout the program. part of what makes today so sweet is it was not easy to get here. it was really hard. there were a lot of bumps on the road to this fantastic moment, many things we could not have anticipated, many things we did not know. throughout it, the mayor has always supported it, help us to solve the problems we face. i think the biggest part of the to be to him is the fact that this is the first leed building -- the environmental certification -- the first leed hospital in california to be built. i think that really speaks to his commitment to environmental issues at a time, 12 years ago, when it was not so popular, and it seemed like a quixotic kind of adventure to be talking about it. he said it was real. he was right. now people talk about it as a day to day economic reality. mr. mayor? >> thank you, doctor, and thank you all for taking the time to be here today. to begin with, i would like to recognize a couple of people. one person whose spirit is here, but whose sisters took the time t
usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that facility we are so pr
and reflect on his contribution. let us also take a moment to reflect on the doctor. we are blessed. you do not want to be the best of the best. you want to be only the one who does what you do. his commitment to public health in san francisco is second to none. he has done an extraordinary job leading by example. this is a city that is doing things that no other city in the united states of america could even imagine doing, things that even when we had all the resources in the world and all the capacity, things that cities could not do. this commitment to an acute care, facility, a skilled nursing facility -- what county is having a ribbon cutting on a new nursing facility in this modern age? and what city and county can lay claim to comprehensive universal health care, regardless of pre- existing conditions, regardless of your ability to pay? dr. mitch kastz has been the architect of all of this. thank you for your leadership. there is the old play towline that if there is any hope for the future of those with lanterns will pass them on to others. let me talk about those that carry bright
were at 72%. this again was historic and people were mesmerized, and no one more than us, that we could reach that goal because the incredible work that you see from the folks behind me and the imagination of recology. and then composting happen. first city in america to require composting. "san francisco's off the deep been. they have lost." we do not know why it did not happen before. the ban on plastic bags, and no one could shop again. we have shut the economy down. water bottles. now with composting, you have gone too far. "you mean, sir, that you will require me to take eggshells, and i have to put them where? the green, the blue, no, no, the green -- that is too much." san franciscans could never figure this out, and some actually went to my private garbage. reporters had a photograph taken of my garbage. it opened the lid. came down and visit me at home. there was a top of a water bottle in a green been, not the blue one. this is outrageous. the garbage police are next because they are going to find you. this is a way of generating money. of course, what we were ultimately gener
and getting us out of your on-time -- out of here on time. i appreciate the lead for a really great organization. for those of you interested in district 6, we are having a debate here on october 7, 6:00 here. thank you very much. [applause] >> we are just going to say good night here. one more paragraph. on behalf of the league of women voters and our partner organizations, the potrero hill organization of businesses, the dog patch organization, the university of california san francisco, media sponsors nbc bay area -- we are proud to be here -- san francisco government television and educational access tv, and certainly, our thanks to the candidates for participating and thanks to you for being here tonight, informing yourself, being good citizens of san francisco. good night, everyone. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. if you would take your seats for this incredibly happy occasion. i am the director of the san francisco department of public health, and i want you to think back 13 years, because that is when i began. and when i started, the very first crisis i had to deal w
care facilities. we went to her many times to help us with san francisco general and to help us with laguna honda hospital. one of the big reasons we are here was the ingenious legislation that she appropriately and wisely introduced on behalf of not just this city but cities and counties large and small up and down the state, and allowed us to leverage federal dollars. it is appropriate now she is in the federal legislature. that is state senator and current congress woman jockey spears j jockeyackie -- jackie spiers. the contributions, large and small, the current members of the board of supervisors, previous president of the board, all of those that contributed so much down at city hall, we are glad you are here, ed lee at the department of public works did, the principal lead agency in the government, thank you for your stewardship of this project. you did a great job. to louise cansell, who put out a press release acknowledging over 100 meters at that now adorn this extraordinary building. there is not $1 wasted in the commitment of public art. it was 2% set aside. if any
with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just >> i work with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and w
political newspaper magazine that used music to bring in an audience. so, my question, what about the new journalists today reaching out to the 20-year-old and 30- year-old? your comment about the two schools of journalism and reaching out, getting quality journalism to the public, how will we do that? >> we have a couple of issues here. the old school and the new school. i guess the question would be -- is there a standard? a single standard anymore for journalism? >> i do not know who sets that standard anymore. frightening, sometimes, to hear the fact that the most trusted name in news is jon stewart. but who can argue that there is not some good quality reporting and information that goes on on a show like that? i think it will be far reaching. we have young people, both in print and on the internet. it is a wide range of opportunity. i do not know that there is any one standard today that anyone could point to that would be the single source. >> what about the chronicle right now? reducing $1 million per week, what does that look like right now? >> thank goodness we are not losing $1
and sensitive caring way. and it will come out of laguna honda. all of us should be proud. all of us should be grateful that we have had a small piece of that particular history. because that history helps me bear a lot of responsibility, to be a husband, to be a father. this institution will always be part of my life. you have taught me how to be that better person. thank you very much and god bless all of you. [applause] >> we are so blessed in our elected leaders in san francisco. senator mark leno has helped us on a bill to make sure that people who need help in a community and want to stay in the community can do so. we are very proud of this new building. at the same time, we want to make sure that people who want to stay in their homes will be able to do so. and so the senator has carried a bill that will enable us, if someone has medicaid, to use those medicaid dollars to increase the number of in-home hours that person has so that we can use those federal dollars instead of hospitalization, instead of long-term care here, in the home. our goal is that the person always has the choi
out the same when does that he is concerned about us sitting 15 feet away are also visible directly out the front windows of the project site and it is a much more direct view then someone sitting on the roof. and we have a picture here, if you have questions. these are fairly small windows. from that angle, at most one would see a few feet into the window on the the best circumstances because of the steep angle, so there is no significant privacy issue and i don't think there ever will be across the street looking into windows that are also visible from other windows on that same street. therefore, we don't think there is any substantial case made for exceptional or extraordinary circumstances in this case and request the commission, and recognition of that, to decide that no further hearing is necessary and allow this project to proceed. thank you very much. president miguel: thank you. commissioner antonini? commissioner antonini: thank you. this is an example of things that can be gained through the pre application process. as was pointed out by the residential design team has s
with the world premiere of three heads, six arms. the artist came from shanghai to help us celebrate the unavailing. we had a chance to speak with him about his work. >> the san francisco arts commission is pleased to be celebrating their relationship between san high and san francisco. the shanghai and san francisco. this is a 30 relationship that stretches back to win dianne feinstein was the mayor of san francisco. we premiered a new work of art here in san francisco called the three heads, six arms. welcome to san francisco. thank you for bringing your extraordinary sculpture. can you tell me about what inspired you to create this sculpture? >> this started with some trips that i took years ago. i went to to bed and i saw a lot of statues and i started to really feel the spiritual life of people in tibet. it really inspires me and i went back to shanghai and i started the creation of this. >> we see that one of the heads of the bullet it is your face. can you talk about the significance of that? -- we see that one of the heads of the buddha is your face. >> i started doing public
to go. and i want to also acknowledged representatives from the u.s. department of congress -- department of commerce minority development agency who are here today. and of course the private sector, our most important and valued partner in delivering this project. i think bob is here today. those are the folks that are going to be building the town. there are contractors making a big impact here not just in building things but in incorporating a real commitment to small and local business participation, and doing an extraordinary job that i believe is going to become a paradigmatic example in the rest of the state, because these numbers are not to be ignored. and of course the small businesses themselves, [unintelligible] now let me take a second to a knowledge the chair of the san francisco transportation authority, my current boss, a man who i think it's well within the lineup of visionaries and people with the big picture. ross has been a member of the board of supervisors since 2004. he is on his first term as chair of the authority since january. during that time he ha
want to tell you a bit about us as residents. we came from all different walks of life in the city. we have had jobs having to do with construction and bus driving, and we have had white collar jobs, and we have been independent artists and writers. the full spectrum have come to laguna honda. and in our day we were great participants in all of the city life. difficult circumstances, sometimes crushingly difficult, have brought many of us here at last to laguna honda. not at last for some of us. despite all differences, we need the healing that laguna honda is famous for. some people who come will be rehabilitated and will leave sunday. others will need 24-hour care for the rest of their lives, and so they will look forward to spending time in the spending -- in this building for years to come. it is exciting to have a new building. it is even more exciting to receive a new model of care, care that is resident centered, care that honors each person as an individual instead of a body in a bed. care that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so
to give us the chance to put our risk into reality and jobs into the future of america and san francisco. i want to announce that we have been working very hard with the last week and with business leaders across america targeting 10 key states that have used this program to great success. mississippi, pennsylvania, florida, texas, michigan, and five other states, and we are starting an online campaign to petition signatures in each state, not only from the employee side, but from a business side. let us create more jobs. let us add to our payroll, payroll taxes, to help us at more to the government, but we need another leg up for another year. help us in his advocacy effort in 2010 and 2011. so, mayor newsom, thank you one more time so much. and i would like to introduce one of the faces of the people who works for me. there is a real sight to this, and it gives me great pleasure to introduce ginger, who works in archives and just celebrated her one-year anniversary with the archives. >> thanks, robert. thanks, mayor newsom. thanks, everyone, for having me here. i am a single mother, an
not have something like that in their area. but i have also had the opportunity firsthand to use the program. i hired an individual that i needed a claims person. i was shorthanded, and i did not have the wherewithal to hire somebody, and i hired this incredible woman who has come in, and i will continue to employ her, but just to give you a story, this literally happened just this week. on monday at 3:00 a.m., she had a child. at 11:00, she called my office and said she would be in tomorrow. we told her that that was not necessary. [laughter] but it shows the dedication, and i am also pleased to say we are providing full benefits, so she has her sick leave and medical, but she has done so much for my company. one of the things that is not talked about on this program, obviously, is the benefit to the employer. it is a benefit to the individual, but the other benefit is to employees that work for us. i have a statement from the claims manager in my office, and her comment was hiring someone who is participating in the jobs now program has enabled him to once again provide custome
it was barbara boxer that brought us over the edge. guys, this is a legitimate stimulus project. this is a legitimate shot already project that would not have taken place a year ahead of schedule. it saved the taxpayers $90 million. that was for the leadership of speaker policy and president obama. 6200 jobs will be created over the course of this project, direct and indirect. 2600 direct jobs. you're seeing the hard hats and some of those folks. not just pictures. they are here physically with us. their lives have been enhanced because of the stimulus project. it was noted $100 million or more with the tiger grant got us a year ahead of schedule. in 2013 this will be done. what an extraordinary thing. this is right around the corner. this is real time construction and real leadership. thank you, speaker policy. thank you, barbara boxer. thank you, senator feinstein. thank you to jake mgoldrick. we had regional projects related to work on celebrity -- collectively together. he helped organize a from work with the golden gate bridge district and other leaders throughout the regio
used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor have his -- if we let the governor have his way to eliminate government support services and to eliminate government general fund support for health services, people who are now able to be in this community would no longer be able to. we would need over 10 laguna honda's. we are not going to let arnold schwarzenegger have his way so that people can have the option of dignity. thank you all for joining us today. [applause] >> san francisco has a great elected city family. i want to acknowledge the president of the board of supervisors, president david chu, supervisor maxwell, subp-- superviser chiu, j
are having a personnel committee -- labor relations meeting in september, maybe you can give us more information at that time about the new teacher project. >> absolutely. >> and we can augment that committee. >> i also would like to add that the last school year we went to visit many schools together, and he also asked do you have any teachers for america teachers, and he asks about how this project is working. overwhelmingly, they said it was really working. i can't remember every school, but i do remember bessie carmichael who said they thought it was great. this is the new teacher project. he asked two questions. and overwhelmingly, they said it was great, that there was a point of contact, that they were able to streamline the hiring, and i just heard great reviews about it. but i look force to hearing it at the labor committee. >> role call, please. >> thank you. >> yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, aye, aye, and yes. >> seven ayes. >> our next item is item q, first reading of plopesals. we give a total of five minutes for public testimony for all of these resolutions. we won't hav
'm going to use consistent divisions between the information so we can continue to be consistent about the report on all things that happened in the office. so firstly, the alcohol mitigation fee. hopefully you all have a -- amending the administrative code to impose a fee on alcoholic beverage wholesalers and persons to distribute or sell alcoholic beverages in san francisco, and in order to recover a portion of the health cost and administration costs for spending chronic ineastbound arenas through the sobering center. that legislation was not presented to this commission for comment, but was presented to the small business commission. it went to budget committee on august 4 and was amended after a great deal of public testimony. many of our permities did show up to speak on that item. it was heard again in a special meeting yesterday in the same committee on august 9, with further public testimony and moved to the full board without recommendation, for consideration after the recess. the small business commission continues to take a position of op significance to that fee, and this
away from us, michael lane. thank you, michael, wherever you are. lastly, my personal reflection on this building. this building, to me, is truly a monument to the tremendous capacity of generosity in the heart of sentences go. the voters of san francisco in their great willingness to support this facility will always have this hospital as a sign of their willingness to help those most in need. these neighborhoods that surround this facility, i think, consider laguna honda at their private treasure. we really do look at this hospital as our own. we love this hospital. we have great care and great love for the residents of this hospital. on behalf of the neighboring residents, to all of the current residents of the hospital, this is for you. we are thrilled we were able to do this for you. thank you, everyone. [applause] >> the work of the health department would never be possible without its commission. the commission is the governing body. you have been around to this project long enough to see some fantastic commissioners who have also gone on and are no longer sitting on the c
into them. if you're just joining us. akio spike was scheduled to be here, but michael singletary has scheduled a meeting add headquarters. >>> we love our football, we love our baseball and basketball, but this is a pro football market. this was a tough sunday. that means when we go to work or school tomorrow, it will be a tough monday. that leads us to the raiders. not much better. raiders in nashville. doesn't deserve this. 81 years old, seemingly al davis did all the right things in the off-season. drafting well, getting rid of jamarcus russell, bringing in campbell, but even gregg pappa said they look like the same old team. 56-yard touchdown pass, he was wide open. ten is see had a 7-3 lead. jason campbell not much protection, just a montage of some of the errors, bad nab over jason campbell's head, a sack, the list gotten on. shades of jamarcus russell, whether it's unfair or not, that's what the fans are thinking. chris johnson, the number one rated fantasy player on the planet, actual the number one rated actual player in terms of running back. 76 yards right before halftime
with us. their lives have been enhanced because of the stimulus project. it was noted $100 million or more with the tiger grant got us a year ahead of schedule. in 2013 this will be done. what an extraordinary thing. this is right around the corner. this is real time construction and real leadership. thank you, speaker policy. thank you, barbara boxer. thank you, senator feinstein. thank you to jake mgoldrick. we had regional projects related to work on celebrity -- collectively together. he helped organize a from work with the golden gate bridge district and other leaders throughout the region. patching together money, patching together collaboration, patching together those wounds that have opened up in the course of this project. in closing, i think you not only for your introduction but for your stewardship and leadership and constancy. thank you for your faith, love, and devotion. this is one of the things i know you care deeply about. that showed throughout the course of this effort and the course of the work that is being done here. thank you very much. [applause] >> i remember then
that will be ongoing, that can deal with disasters like this, so we encourage people to use that. clearly, that is an option along with the red cross and the other very well known traditional avenues. sf gives back is set up on our city's official website. mayor newsom: there are a number of calls -- puc has received some calls. david has received a number of calls. anything you want to add? you have a couple of centers that were access for emergency response. i know there have been some environmental questions. >> we have a really great public utilities commission. in addition to the san francisco jail and airport, we have hundreds of employees in the immediate vicinity because we operate the regional water system, so in that capacity, they were able to immediately respond. in the first hours, that was all in mutual aid since for fire support. our first concern was making sure san bruno have water. they are our wholesale water customer, and there were some problems because one of the water mains was damaged. second, we did bring water trucks into the area to thecal fire. third, all those
. >> thank you for watching. join us for future episodes. you can >> welcome to culturewater. in 2001, the san francisco arts commission and tampa does go public library established an arts master plan for the city soon to be renovated branch library. almost 10 years later, the san francisco arts commission has integrated a collection of vibrant new artworks by bay area artists into five new libraries, and there is more on the way. here is a closer look at some of the projects. >> the branch library improvement program is a bond funded program undertaken by the san francisco public library to upgrade each of the branch libraries throughout the neighborhoods. one of the great benefits of this opportunity is that each of these branches has a unique artwork that has been created specifically for that branch, based on input from people who live near that branch, in the surrounding neighborhood. >> trur- minded. there was a lot of community support for the project. i try to make it about the true hill and its history. they were something that natives used for making houses. the constructio
are here to wake up the u.s. senate. we are here to wake them up because if they do not do their jobs you will not have a job, and that is why we need your help and your support and your voice. and we need it loudly and clearly. let me just conclude by thanking each and every one of you. we are going to hear from business leaders that have stepped up to the plate. you are going to hear from some of your friends and colleagues that have actually gotten a chance to give jobs. i am going to ask you, "do not leave. i need you." it infuriates me. the right all these stories that talk about it all the time, but there is not one camera here. that is wrong. i appreciate the crown and the examiner here. i want all of you on the steps. i hope the steps can hold us. we are going to do a family photo. we are going to send it all over the country. no other city has done this. we are going to send it to harry reid. we are going to send it to president obama. we are going to send it back east to congress. so you are not allowed to leave until we do this. but in the interim we are going to hear from peop
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)